Innovation is a state of mind

 

There has been so much said, written, shown and discussed about innovation. Many amazing examples, success stories, awards, and academic definitions have reached our attention. And yet, we are fascinated about how and when innovation happens and how to keep it going.

We are living in the golden age of innovation. Due to technological advances, enabling creation, access and reach of new concepts, we can all become successful innovators.  Unlike innovation in manufacturing, digital innovation requires as little as an idea and some extent of digital literacy to transfer that idea into a new digital interface. It’s no longer the big companies that have the luxury of translating creative ideas into tangible innovative products or services, it’s a plausible proposition for an individual or a small group of individuals to make the innovation real.

We know that it is easier than ever to become innovative and yet we are often feeling behind the buzz. This is even harder for organisations which have resources to implement the changes, yet they are far more resistant to become innovative companies that reflect on constant technological, industry and consumer changes. They might have the best of technical and creative talents in house, yet they are not seen as innovative as they would love to be.

And then you come to visit one of the many coworking spaces and you feel that digital innovation is so widespread it almost feels contagious. For these people innovation is a state of mind. They see no other way than a constant creative and intellectual curiosity and openness to disrupt the status quo, as if yesterday did not matter, accepting that their attempts might not be perfect or feasible. They not only understand that, they in fact expect that someone or something will challenge their innovative process and by doing so help them to improve the original thought, product, or service. Their way of thinking and behaving is a constant and open innovation, not the kind that is cooked behind the closed doors, with the unwillingness to share the recipe while hoping that people will love the meal forever.

 

 


  • Innovation